Tag: what makes a good freelance writer?

If Dailey Freelance Were Running For President

Not long ago I was trying to push my Facebook friends to get my Dailey Freelance page some shares. I told them I expected no fewer than one billion of them. I vaguely suggested that there would be a car given away to someone if it happened. I got six page likes. A friend of mine told me I should hold a rally to get things going.

Nah.

But that got me thinking. What if Dailey Freelance were running for president? Stay with me on this one. Dailey Freelance has the qualities people want, or say they want, in a leader.

You want someone who:

– Represents you. This is the whole point of both voting for a president, and of hiring a freelance writer. The president has to be the voice of the nation as a whole, somehow. I have to give your audience a comprehensive look at what they can expect from you. Not every post can accomplish that, but given time and an on-going assignment (say four or eight years?), that is Dailey Freelance’s agenda.

– Is a great communicator. This goes hand in hand with “Represents you” because I cannot represent you well without presenting a digestible message. There is an aspect of advertising in what I do, which requires me to keep the heart of your message direct and snappy while dressing it up with that “something extra” which wins a vote of confidence.

“Tells it like it is.” One of the most endearing quality in a candidate for a lot of people is the candidate’s “telling it like it is.” Whether the “like it is” they are talking about is really “like it is” is debatable. Let me be clear, though. My agenda as your representative, is telling your public what they can expect from you. You have no reason not to want that to match what they actually get. I’d be doing you and your audience a great disservice if it didn’t.

– Is resilient and open to change. This is a creative process. As a freelance writer, I have to be open to new ideas, and if my vision is vetoed, I have to be able to bounce back with an amended version of that vision. I like to try to envision many different angles from which we can approach your messaging.

– Will be diplomatic. It is important to me to be easy to work with. And it isn’t necessarily just a “the customer (you) is always right” situation. Just like the president ideally works for the public who quite literally hires that person, I work for you. But I do my best to work with you, to find out what will do the most good for you as I execute your vision in words.

– Will be level-headed. When I have my assignment from a client, I might do a preliminary outline right away just to establish a plan for myself. Depending on the deadline, I’ll likely set the work aside after that. I’ve never found myself with writer’s block with client work in front of me, though the time has to be right. I try to be in the proper state of mind before diving into client work. It’s not rocket surgery and it’s not magic, but just like some of the major decisions a president has to make, inspiration can be a key ingredient.

I’m Dailey Freelance, and I approve this message.

Maybe Their’s To Little Time For Worrying About It? Or Is Their.

Do you think people who become writers are those who are naturally inclined to be grammar police types? Or is it more likely to be the other way around?

I’ve considered myself a writer for as long as I can remember. But it has only been in recent years that I’ve felt a building irritation whenever I see statements ending in question marks (“I thought this was a question? Maybe in some universe it is?”), questions ending in periods, or – God help us all – the wrong too, to, there or their.

I blame the fast pace of social media, and the inconvenience of switching over to symbols mode from alphabet mode on a mobile device. It’s not really inconvenient but it is another step. I think people figure everyone is going to know what they mean anyway and life is short. They don’t want to throw away valuable moments on strict adherence to the laws of grammar.

I think the only reason everyone is going to know what they mean anyway is because it is becoming the norm.

It probably stands out to me more because, while I do use social media quite a bit, I do not use a mobile device.

Not at all.

I’m dead serious.

I went through a phase years back when I was making it my life’s work to point out everybody’s infractions with to and too and there and their, etc.

I’m not proud of it. Just being honest.

And right in the middle of all of this, out of the blue I started catching myself doing the very same things. It was humbling.

Then recently, I started noticing an increasing popularity of question marks where they don’t belong and missing question marks where they did belong. I was legitimately baffled. And I started letting people know about it.

And then the question mark button on my computer got stuck and I couldn’t use it. I knew what was happening, on a karmic level. For a while I would type out “question mark” where the punctuation should have been. I guess I was doing my best to be accurate, but I was also probably doing penance of some sort, going through all those extra keystrokes.

Then my keyboard started working the way it was meant to.

Though I hope being so serious about these things makes me a better freelance writer, or if nothing else a better editor, it does not keep me from writing in a casual, informal style when the job calls for it. And there are a ton of other grammatical rules I am probably very lax about. Like commas. I put them wherever I bloody well feel they belong.

Let’s call my approach uptight informality.