Tag: freelance writers in Rochester MN

I’m Moving.

…..very soon.

This blog originally came of the desire to tell stories of my experiences as a writer. Since I was a teen first discovering the craft of writing, I’ve dreamed of piloting a publication called “The Dailey Weekly.” This seemed like a good platform for the moniker. It quickly became my place to promote and advertise my freelance writing business.

In the long and many months since Covid-19 struck, that effort has become less and less productive. I started to lose the audience I was building so I tried to branch out by posting writing on various subjects which would serve as demos for anyone who still was interested in a freelance writer. Unfortunately, as my content became varied, something got skewed in the algorithm. Google doesn’t seem to know what to do with it anymore. At the same time, it doesn’t seem to be making any headway with WordPress users either.

For all intents and purposes, this blog is just broken. That’s a hell of a pickle to be in when you’re trying to build an audience. It’s as frustrating as it is puzzling.

I am going to start over with a new publication. It will be less business-promotiony and more observational humor pieces. Well, whether it is humor will be a matter of opinion, I guess. The point is I will be writing for the sake of writing again. I won’t focus on “current events” because I think we’ve all had more of that than we need for a while now. I’m envisioning a column-type thing. Real Andy Rooney-like. Without the eyebrows.

I need an audience that will interact with my work and exchange ideas with me.

I haven’t settled on a name for it yet so I haven’t created the blog. If you’ve stuck with me so far though, please hang around and once I’ve generated some content I’ll let you know where you can keep following my work.

Onward.

The Summer of My Discontent

Something weird has happened this year. I know you’re probably thinking “Umm, yeah a lot of weird has happened this year, man. Keep up.”

No, not that, but it’s probably related to that to some degree. What I am talking about is that for the first time in my life that I can think of, I can not wait for winter to start.

Maybe it is because of COVID-19 and the havoc it has brought on our economy and the over-all limitations imposed upon our everyday goings and doings. But it is also because it feels like this is the hottest summer in the history of mankind. It isn’t, I don’t think. But I am tired of the humidity, a.k.a. “the air you can wear.”

I’ve already told my wife that when it snows, I am going to go “play in the snow” and I swear I will. I am not going to build a snowman. I intend to frolic. I had been saying I did not want snow. Just cold. I always say my wheelchair is allergic to snow. The more I think of it though, I’m not picky. If there is one thing I’ve learned this year it’s how to stay home if need be.

I’m finding myself getting excited, anxious for winter. I sometimes catch a glimpse of the calendar and I’m dumbfounded that we still have a third of 2020 to go. It really feels like winter should be any day now.

I envision hunkering down in a quiet country cabin in front of the fireplace (because you can’t stay cold all of the time), a refrigerator well-stocked with apple cider or hot cocoa-making supplies (depending on my mood), sitting at a giant oak desk (a brobdingnagian fortress of a desk) with an olde-timey quill pen and parchment paper, and a hefty list of freelance writing projects to work on.

I’m kidding. I don’t have a cabin.

But apart from the things about our society that need to change forever – which this whole year was a chance for us to do – like most of us, I would like to pick up where I left off in the early spring. Enough lamentation though. When I go frolic in that first snowfall, I’ll be taking the opportunity to embrace what was previously repellent to me. I’m well on my way to accepting whatever this winter will bring.

Opportunity Comes Once Every 6,700 Years

Today my personal Facebook page gave me a bittersweet reminder of where I was as a freelance writer one year ago. That day last year I posted a link to a piece I did for my first on-going client of which I was particularly proud.

It is bittersweet because of how quickly a string of very promising leads this spring amounted to naught. It was partly a failure on my part to seal the deals, but it also had a lot to do with the emergence of Covid-19. I do my freelance work mostly from home, whereas the leads were customer-facing places of business. Surely they were keeping a very close eye on the unfolding situation.

Not that I wasn’t. Maybe it was the idealist in me that kept plugging away at leads as though the world were not about to be drastically upended. Maybe it is the idealist in me that keeps me believing that I’ll have those opportunities again, and what keeps me promoting my freelance business. It was still fairly new when Covid came along, so it turns out last year amounted to its glory days.

I’ve been thinking a lot about all of this as the Neowise comet passes by this week. If you aren’t aware of it, the comet will be visible between now and July 24th, and will not return for 6,700 Earth years. If you’re doing the math at home, that is a once-in-almost-one-hundred-lifetimes sight to see.

We’ve all probably been told at some point that certain opportunities come once in a lifetime. Covid or no Covid, a lot of us can’t help but wondering what opportunities we allowed to shoot right past and burn out before our eyes before Covid came along and made it all kind of irrelevant. That’s not something one ought to dwell on, and I won’t.

I don’t think that last summer was my only window when it comes to local freelance writing. Because I know that commerce will bounce back, one way or another. It may not look like it did last summer, but we will recover. So I hope that when my fellow local business owners get back on their feet, I will be able to connect with them and help them in that recovery.

For tonight, I think I’ll head outside and sit under the stars for a while and take in a celestial spectacle. At least of that one I can be certain this week is my one chance in this lifetime. I don’t want to miss it.

Make World Social Media Day Every Day

Today, June 30th, is in fact World Social Media Day. I don’t know what that means precisely as most of the suggestions for how you can “celebrate” this day are things that people are increasingly doing anyway.

But I’d be remiss if I did not take this opportunity to remind you that if you own a business or are in charge of the marketing for such a business, you have to get serious about social media.

I’d call it “Social Marketing” but that is already a thing, and it’s different.

I am a freelance writer but I’ve always encouraged clients and prospective clients to take my work and unleash it upon the world via all manner of social media and let that wave of influence work the way it does. I find most businesses have a company Facebook page, maybe a Twitter account (or whatever the next big thing is this week) but they don’t always know what to post that is related to the business.

If you post the writing I do for you on your social media, odds are your followers are current customers – people who know your work, who trust and believe in you. When they, in turn, share my post, their endorsement should carry enough weight to inspire a number of the next wave to come see what you’re all about. If they like what they see, they will share the post with their friends. Ideally.

Then they tell two friends.
Then they tell two friends.
And so on. And so forth.

As “World Social Media Day” implies, you can get your message around quite literally the entire world in a day if you strike the right chord with the right people. If you do, well that’s gravy, but all you’ve really got to do is get people in your immediate area to share it with more people in your immediate area, depending on how massive you want to become.

Social media is the ultimate passive marketing, the most effective way to exponentially increase the number of people who hear about you, all with a good reason to trust the endorsement because they heard it from a friend. It is so much more personal than an ad or a local news article written about your business.

Let’s start with a conversation to determine what you need your public to know:

What makes your business so shareable?

What will inspire your followers to turn around and say “Hey guys, you’ve gotta go check this out”?

Think about it and get in touch with me. Let’s go!

Because I’m Not a Blogger.

I’ve recently changed the name of “Dailey Freelance Blogging” to, simply, “Dailey Freelance” for a simple reason. It is for this very simple reason that I have always kind of been uncomfortable with the name. But I had business cards printed up and everything so I’d stuck with it. But since my business and everyone else’s is experiencing some downtime currently, I thought I’d make the transition.

The very simple reason is that I am not really a blogger.

Wait, though. I’m not a fraud or anything. It’s just that the clients I have had, I have written things for their blog, but I am hands-off as far as the actual blog is concerned. I write the words, I turn them over to the client, and they do as they will from that point on.

I do provide suggestions of topics for future blog posts, which I would then write. Anything more would be overstepping the boundaries, as it would require my being given access to the clients’ website dashboard. Most business owners have a decent handle on how to use the blog if they have one. They just lack the time to write, and that’s why they call on me.

I know what you’re thinking. You are reading this on my blog. So I’m a blogger. Well I do use this blog to make you aware of my service and show you what I can do. But that service – what I do – is writing.

The new name is not only more accurate, but it will also save me a lot of time. Those of you who are interested in a service like mine know exactly what a blogger is. But I have spent a lot of time explaining to others what a blogger is and does.

But “freelance” is sort of a vague term. For clarity’s sake, I was going to switch it over to Dailey Freelance Writing, but that would be “DFW” and I’m in a wheelchair and I already get enough people thanking me for my service even though I am not, in fact, a Veteran of Foreign Wars. I’m serious. I’m not trying to be funny.

So anyway, welcome to Dailey Freelance.

That’s Your Business in the Spotlight

Usually when I open discussion with a potential client about their vision for marketing themselves on their blog, I try to give them a good range of possibilities. I don’t want anything to be off the table. Because I want to reach as many people for them as possible, while keeping it within the realm of those who might reasonably, at some point, become their clients.

Though I plan to continue to put a variety of choices up for consideration, what I am finding is that what most people want from me upfront is a feature on them (the owner) and/or their staff members.

I get that. Business owners know that while the quality of the product or service they provide is paramount, they also know that if you let people get to know you, you give them a chance to like you. If they like your personality, they are more likely to follow your company’s blog and/or it’s social media. By then, if they haven’t already, they are more likely to become your client because you’ve shown them what you can do for them. Then it’s up to you to earn their repeat business.

So maybe we start with a profile bit. I am an interview journalist at heart after all. So sitting down with you and your staff is a good opportunity for me to get a sense of the image you want to project. Having done that, the sky is just the beginning of the places we can go to make your business increasingly visible.

Can’t wait.

Foresight 2020

Hey, Happy 2020, alright?

When the new year comes, I don’t make a point of big personal statements, soaring platitudes about what I’ve learned in the past 365 or 366 days or where I see life taking me in the year to come. I try to trust that the past has been instilled in me and installed in my consciousness well enough that its lessons will serve me well, and I usually just like to see for myself what the next year will bring as it happens.

It’s not that January 1st is just another day for me. But I am not the type of person who thinks that somewhere between December 31st and January 1st we discover a “New You” for the New Year.

If you are that kind of person, that is great. No sincere effort toward personal betterment is ever wasted.

But for me, like many people, at the end of most years, I am simply ready for it to be over. Take 2019 for example. In just these few days since Christmas I have

  • been sick
  • had a minor skin wound
  • had part of my wheelchair break off, and
  • someone sat on the laptop on which I do my freelance blogging work screwing it up irrevocably, I fear. I’m working on seeing what I can do about that. Meantime, I’m writing this on an older laptop. I’m soldiering on the best I know how.

Yet guess what. After all of the frustrations numerated above, tonight I discovered that I’ve got a new gig writing about one of the things that I’ve always told myself I am meant to be writing about. The Beatles. I can’t wait to jump into 2020 with this project immediately in front of me.

The traditional concept of hindsight will nag at me saying that I should have been doing these types of projects for years now. But I know there is no point in thinking that way. It is here now. Hindsight is 2020 because you have the benefit of…well, hindsight. You’ve been there and done that already, so you have an informed perspective on events.

I want to approach the year 2020 like that, except going forward instead of looking back. I want to approach the future of Dailey Freelance with the confidence of someone who sets goals with an informed certainty.

I want you, the client to set expectations on my work for you with a certainty as though when I discuss what I’m going to do for you, you can consider it already done.

I want to cover every freelance subject I write on with the certainty of an expert, to make myself so well-informed on the subject that it will be the most natural thing in the world for me to write your content.

So let’s put 2019 behind us and move into 2020 with certainty.



Write What You Know

Many years ago, I began amateur blogging, not really certain of what the point of it would be or who would read it (I know, that sounds like the first line of every blog anyone has ever started), but doing it in earnest nonetheless.

My first one was all about my life with spina bifida and various issues involved with disabilities. In my community. In America. In the world.

The experience gave me a wide-ranging perspective on myself and others. I’d never known a ton of other people with major disabilities before that. The blog grew in its reach the more I wrote from experience. But more importantly, it grew the more I wrote from a growing inquisitiveness on the subject.

My second just-for-kicks blogging project was even more in earnest. It was a blog about the Hindu religion/culture/community. In my city. In America. In the world and beyond.

It gave me a greater understanding of a culture I had begun to delve into deeply, but had just reached the point where I could fluently share my personal insights on it. In doing so I made connections with some people who mean a great deal to me to this day. It showed me that what I thought of as my “self” was a much more vast inner experience than I’d ever imagined.

Fast forward years later and the next two freelance projects for Dailey Freelance Blogging are for a wheelchair and medical supply shop and for a local international community. Though the material from those original blogs has been dispersed in various ways, the experience remains with me.

Though I come to the wheelchair shop project with a lifetime of experience, I can now confidently say I will “write what I know.”

The Hindu blog was an even more life-changing experience. I learned new customs, systems of thought, new ways of looking at the world. With that background, I can now approach the local international community with a mind that is heavily inclined to opening, and embracing.

Sometimes you don’t know until years later why you took on certain projects with such diligence.

A Whole Batch o’ Satchmo: My Top 10 Favorite Louis Armstrong Songs.

This is a random post to demonstrate the kind of content Dailey Freelance might generate for you and your business. I mean if you’re a dog groomer, let’s say, then of course the subject matter would reasonably reflect that. And I look forward to writing about your dog groomer business.

But for the purposes of this post, I felt like writing about my favorite “Satchmo” songs.

I toyed with the idea of making #10 on this list a whole list of songs itself, just to demonstrate that when it comes to Louis, you can’t narrow it down to ten. But we’re going to stick to ten. And now you’ll never know what my also-ran songs were. You’ll be okay. So here we go.

10. Cornet Chop Suey – This is one of the early Louis Armstrong songs that were so mind-blowing when they came out for being almost impossible to put down in musical notation. It’s been done, but Louis put that whole undertaking to the test with this and various other songs (maybe those songs are the also-rans. Who knows?) There simply are not symbols to indicate what he’s doing on some of these songs.

9. Storyville Blues – The red-light district of New Orleans known as Storyville doesn’t exist anymore. In many ways its spirit still hangs in the air, lives on in the people of the city. This version by Armstrong has such a foggy, dreamlike quality to it, that listening to it today, it really does feel like a portal into another place and time. Building on that theme, unlike the other entries on this list, search as I may, I have no idea when it was recorded.

8. S.O.L. Blues – This is a gritty little ditty about bad luck. And yes, the S.O.L. stands for exactly what you think it stands for. There is no profanity in the song, but because of the title, along with the “out of luck” theme of the lyrics, Armstrong was made to re-record this later with a new title (Gully Low Blues) and different lyrics.

7. You Rascal, You – An ode to jealous rage, this song’s lyrics would probably not fly too well today. Lyrics aside, I’ve always heard this as a very early rock n’ roll song. That’s probably why the song has held up so well and there have been so many covers.

6. Ain’t Misbehavin’ – This one was made famous by Fats Waller. I myself became familiar with it through Leon Redbone, an artist who is not from New Orleans, but he should be. Anyway this one is a nice counterpart to the last one in that it is an ode to absolutely loyalty.

5. Riverside Blues – Much like Sidney Bechet’s “All of Me” it begins with a quite long tinkling piano intro, but like the Bechet tune, when Satch starts blowing his horn, he rips this song a new one.

4. A Kiss to Build A Dream On – This song has one of the most powerful solos he ever recorded. I always loved the way it seems to begin a beat or so before you expect it to. It’s almost like, per the lyrics, he’s saying what he has to say before his chance to do so expires.

3. On The Sunny Side Of The Street – Louis Armstrong is one of the only singers who could make such a gruff voice sound so warm, and this song is a prime example of him doing just that. He really does make you feel like you could “leave your worries.” In short, it’s one of those “everything’s gonna work out all right” songs.

2. When The Saints Go Marching In – Before Louis Armstrong recorded it in 1938, this was just a traditional, devotional song. He was the first to record it in a secular, popular music context. Eight decades later, it is practically synonymous with New Orleans. Now there are dozens of songs that are practically synonymous with New Orleans, but this was the first.

1. Do You Know What It Means To Miss New Orleans? – I heard this song for the first time when I was about ten years old on a cassette tape of an Abbott and Costello radio broadcast. It was sung by Marilyn Maxwell. I didn’t learn till years later that Louis was the original artist. Maxwell and others sing “the moonlight on the bayou” in the song where Armstrong sang “Oh the Mardi Gras, the memories.” While the line Armstrong used immediately evokes images of the heart of New Orleans, to me “moonlight on the bayou” calls to mind more of a rural Louisiana feel.

The more I listened to this song over the years, though I’d never been there, eventually the song planted in my mind what I’d characterize as “reverse nostalgia” for the place. I did “miss” it, somehow. Now that I’ve been there, the sentiment has been confirmed.

When I Wrote “Songs” and Was a Legend in My Own Mind

It seems like I have always been writing, my whole life, in one form or another. There was a period in my life (my teens and early twenties) when I wrote “songs”. I started out writing rap songs, then when I moved away from my collaborator and best friend, I drifted off into writing what I heard in my head as rock “songs”.

What’s with the quotes?

Well, I never really mastered any musical instrument, and never bothered to work on anything digital, so the words I wrote were only ever songs inside my brain.

My passion is for words. Making them click. Making the message come through in a provocative (call to action) or at least amusing way.

I am a writer.

But that is not a limitation. If someone has illustrations for a book and needs something written, or if they have an idea but are just really good at the business end of getting it published, fine. I am their man. There is nothing wrong with being a piece of the puzzle in the creative process. It can really be inspiring and motivating. If you’ve ever watched the TV show Songland, you may know what I mean.

I am just a writer of words. And that’s okay.

I could have done something with my “songs” — I could have collaborated with some musicians. I didn’t, but I could have. I moved on to the various other, more productive phases of my writing career that you’ve already read about if you’ve followed this blog.

But the point is always, always know the value of the piece of the creative puzzle that you have to offer. It could be the piece someone else is looking for in their own puzzle.