Category: Television

A Canadian Folk Delicacy, Sort of.

I realize that you don’t always know what you’re going to get from this blog. One week I might be writing about baseball. The next it’ll be jazz music. The next thing you know, I’m expounding about food. And if the mood strikes me, I might give you the rundown on my philosophy as a freelance writer.

Tonight it’s going to be food. Namely, the new KFC fries. Because the heart wants what the heart wants on a Monday after work.

But I digress.

From the TV ads for the new fries, I got the impression they’d be a crispy, heavily breaded situation. I asked out loud “chicken fried fries?” when I saw them.

But no.

They were tasty though. They reminded me and my wife of the Taco Bell nacho fries without the seasoning, somehow. While I ate them, I went back and forth on whether I’d prefer them over the KFC mashed potatoes going forward. I think if I had to choose one, I’d stick with the mashed, but so long as each are available, I may consider going back and forth between the two depending on my mood.

Except that right now the only meal deals including the fries that I am aware of pairs them with chicken fingers, or nuggets. I don’t think I’d be likely to choose chicken fingers or nuggets over the traditional fried chicken terribly often. I only did so today because it was the deal. We get KFC infrequently though, and the fries are not going to make me go there more often. They are not stand-alone fries that one would order on their own merit like the ones at McDonald’s or the curly fries at Arby’s.

A traditional three-piece chicken meal (leg, wing, breast) will always seem right with mashed potatoes so it’d be no big loss if they don’t pair it up with the fries in a “deal.”

The fingers come with a choice of a couple different dipping sauces and they offered ketchup for the fries. My wife being Canadian and I being a Canadian by marriage, we got a side order of gravy to dip the fries in. That’s sort of a folk delicacy in Canada. You melt some cheese curds over it and you’ve got yourself some authentic Canadian poutine. They should just go ahead and do that.

The “Winona” Post

The town in which I went to college and lived for seven years was recently immortalized in a Super Bowl commercial.

Sort of.

Around here, for weeks leading up to the Super Bowl the air was thick with speculation over what the ad was for. We knew actress Winona Ryder had been in Winona, MN (her birthplace and namesake) filming a commercial. Some said it was for “Stranger Things.” Some said it was for Ryder Truck Rental, which, I don’t know, maybe they were opening a branch in Winona and were making a REALLY big splash about it.

The commercial ended up being for Squarespace, a website building company. It also ended up being a bit underwhelming for the locals, because it did not show anything of substance about the city of Winona. There are actually quite a few landmarks and businesses that we are known for, far and wide. There was a several minutes long version of the commercial available online which included some of it, but it wasn’t the same.

Not for us.

To be fair, to the rest of the country it was just an ad about a website-building company with a marginally famous actress in it. As far as they were concerned, the town called Winona could have been totally fictional. But there were people in Winona watching for that commercial to see the places they drove by or visited regularly. Some may not have known or cared what Squarespace is. I didn’t.

That dichotomy kind of mirrors how, on Super Bowl Sunday, some are totally indifferent toward the actual game but are absolutely engaged with the halftime show, or vise versa.

That is the fine line you walk when trying to reach your audience, whether you are advertising or marketing. You’re not talking about a million-dollar spot during the biggest TV event of the year, but the same principle applies.

– Do you want to put your products and services in the spotlight?

– Do you want to showcase your staff and the company’s personality?

– Do you want to cover a spectrum of current events relating to your company’s industry to demonstrate your company philosophy?

If this dilemma sounds like your life as a business owner, check in with Dailey Freelance. We can work together and find a good mix of content in order to reach out to all of the various subgroups of your audience who are interested in what you do for one reason or another. We can reach out to them all. It is strategic, and it is not a perfect science. But I think we can cover a lot of ground without watering down your message.